Blog

Logo BIG.png

What is Trans-nerolidol?



Trans-nerolidol, or simply nerolidol, is a terpene found in many plants with intense aromas. Isolated in 1972, this terpene shows some useful properties. While not as common as other terpenes, several cannabis cultivars yield high amounts of Nerolidol, including Bubba Kush.

Where Does Nerolidol Come From?

Nerolidol is found in many plants known for their smells such as:

• Neroli (orange flower)

• Jasmine

• Ginger

• Tea tree

• Lemon Grass

• Lavendar


The Nerolidol Flavor Profile

The smell of Nerolidol is reminiscent of a mixture of roses, citrus, and apples and can be described in general as woody, citrus and floral. The flavor is a delicate balance of lavender, lily, and cedar.


Common Uses


Nerolidol has been traditionally used for its relaxing, slightly sedative effects. Nerolidol has been extensively studied for a variety of therapeutic uses, particularly for its anti-parasitic, antifungal, and anti-bacterial properties. This is why it's fairly common in household cleaners. The FDA has approved it as a flavor additive. Its aromatic smell also lends itself to fragrances, soap, shampoo, and many other products as well.

What Are The Benefits of Nerolidol?

Nerolidol has many helpful properties. It has been extensively researched over the years. An ongoing research project relates to Nerolidols' hydrophobic nature. Researchers are investigating Nerolidol to see if it enhances the transmission of pharmaceuticals across the blood-brain barrier. In addition, it's also used for:


• Sedative • Anti-anxiety

• Antimicrobial

• Anti-parasitic

• Anti-oxidant

• Pain relief


Drawbacks of Nerolidol

In high enough doses, Nerolidol can cause skin and eye irritation. If this occurs seek immediate medical attention. Due to the previously mentioned hydrophobic properties, Nerolidol is incredibly toxic to aquatic life.

How Much Nerolidol Should I Take?

For more information on how much Nerolidol you should ingest, it's recommended you consult your doctor.


Nerolidol and the Entourage Effect

Because of its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier easily, Nerolidol may be a key player in the "entourage effect". Early indications are promising however, research to that end is pending.

The Take-Away

Trans-nerolidol is a rather unique yet very common terpene. Lots of research has been done and is currently ongoing. Its hydrophobic nature could make it a wonderful addition to your daily terpene intake.

27 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All